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Course Description

The following courses are offered by Sociology. Not all courses are offered in an academic year. The core courses are HS7001, HS7002 and HS7003. Students are reminded to register and pass these courses when they are offered as they might not be offered every semester. 

Please click here​ for the courses that will be offered in a particular semester.

HS7001 Classical Sociological Theory and Research
This course examines the theoretical foundations and research traditions of sociology as a discipline. In particular, the contributions of Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, and Max Weber are discussed against the backdrop of the social and intellectual contexts of their times. The course considers these and other classical theorists' continuing relevance for the analysis of social change and the development of social theory. 

Examples of course themes include:
​​• Social theory and the antecedents of disciplinary sociology 
• The social theory of Karl Marx 
• The social theory of Emile Durkheim 
• The social theory of Max Weber 
• Other contributions to classical sociological theory 


​HS7002 Contemporary Sociological Theory and Research​
Legacies of classical theory are critically reviewed in light of 20th century developments. New schools of social theory are examined. The syllabus centers on contributions of the following contemporary sociological theorists. Examples of course themes include Social Theory in the 20th century and beyond The Social Theory and Research of Major Theorists: e.g. Michel Foucault, Jürgen Habermas, Pierre Bourdieu.
Additionally, students will consider contributions of other theorists from a secondary list according to the discretion of the faculty.

 

 
HS7003 Theory and Method in Social Research
The syllabus for this course will be determined by the individual faculty subject to the approval of the Division Head. It will focus on theoretical methods in social research; that is, the relationship between theory and data in the process of doing sociological research (Note: Some students may be required to take HS9910 in addition to or instead of this course). Course themes include: (1) Philosophy of Social Science, (2) The Logic of Social Research, (3) Applications of Social Research, (4) Research Design and Research Methods.

 
 
HS7101 Graduate Seminar: Economy and Society
Economic man' is not an isolated individual but is embedded in networks of social relations. This course examines social aspects of economic life historically and in the contemporary context. Course themes include:

 
• Traditions in the sociology of economic change 
• Institutions and the economy 
• Social inequalities in economic life 
• Stratification and class analysis 
• Networks and the organization of global capitalism 

 

 
HS7102 Graduate Seminar: Political Sociology
Power is a fundamental feature of social life, and it is manifested most obviously in the role of political institutions, especially in the modern nation-state. This course examines the nature and exercise of power and political control. In tracing the making of the modern state, it considers the ideological processes that legitimize political rule and government authority, especially in relation to nation-building and citizenship. Course themes include:

• Theories of power 
• Theories of the state 
• Social class, politics, and ideology 
• Social movements 
• Civil society and the public sphere 
• Local politics and the politics of global governance

 

 
HS7103 Graduate Seminar: Sociology of Culture
Culture is transmitted by the institutions and processes of 'socialization' and is drawn into the social construction of personal and collective identities. The graduate seminar will be organized by the following themes: Identity and social change; Ideas, culture, and social change; Contemporary culture in sociological perspective; Culture and tradition in a global age

 

 
HS7104 Graduate Seminar: Sociology of Organisations
Social organisations are a central feature of modern society. This course is concerned with bureaucratic and post-bureaucratic organis​ations and with the relations between these organisations and their environments. The course examines social organisations in term of hierarchy, control, authority, decision-making and accountability.
 
• Theories of formal social organisations 
• Bureaucracy, authority and social control 
• Work and occupations 
• Organisations in industrial and post-industrial societies

 

 
HS7201 Microsociologies
This course introduces graduate students to micro-sociological theories prevalent in the field of sociology.  There are several micro-sociological perspectives and students will develop knowledge of them (symbolic interaction, cognitive sociology, ethnomethodology, dramaturgy).  Students will study the broader conceptions of social behavior and relationships from these perspectives. Students will also conduct independent research and analyze data using micro-sociological perspectives and methods.

 

 
HS7202 Sociology of Islam in the Malay World
This course explores the effects of globalization and modernization upon the religious life of the Malays. By employing sociological insights, the course aims to provide theoretical tools to critically examine how various Muslim and non-Muslim social groups in the Malay World respond and adapt to the onset of these social processes. It will explore themes such as economic development, education, social movements, intellectual discourses, political leadership, religious ideologies, public health and popular culture to disentangle the ways in which global processes such as Western and alternative forms of modernity are experienced within the context of pietization in the Malay World.

 

 
HS7203 Special Topics in Social Psychology
This course introduces a range of sociological theories that are not covered in existing graduate courses. The concepts and theories learnt in this course are useful to develop student analytical skills in studying the relationship between science, technology, and society. It contains interdisciplinary approaches that combine history, sociology, politics, and anthropology.

 

 
HS7204 Postcolonial Sexuality
Not Available

 

 
HS7205 Global Sociology
This course is intended to provide a critical examination of the pressing global issues, problems and challenges from sociological perspectives. The objective of the course is to familiarize students with current theoretical frameworks and contemporary debates on global issues centered around four broad interrelated themes: globalization and development, global environment, gender, and sustainability and social justice.

 
 
HS7206 Science, Technology and Social Theory 
This course introduces a range of sociological theories that are not covered in existing graduate courses. The concepts and theories learnt in this course are useful to develop student analytical skills in studying the relationship between science, technology, and society. It contains interdisciplinary approaches that combine history, sociology, politics, and anthropology.

 

 
HS7888 Directed Reading in Sociology
This course is designed to provide a student with a more individualized course of reading that goes beyond the existing graduate courses. In this course, students are expected to read widely in both classical and contemporary sources under the guidance of their supervisor. The content and requirements of each Directed Reading course are determined by the student as well as his/her appointed supervisor pertaining to the student’s intended field of specialization. The reading list, written work and meeting times will be negotiated between the appointed supervisor and the student. The final detailed syllabus will be subjected to the approval of the Head of Division prior to the commencement of the course.

 
 
HS7889 Independent Study in Sociology
This course provides students with an opportunity to engage in independent research related to their proposed thesis. The content and requirements of each Independent Study module are determined by the appointed supervisor and the student, depending on their area of interest. In this course, students are expected to read widely in both classical and contemporary sources under the guidance of their supervisor.

 

 
HS7890 Directed Reading 2 
This course introduces specific topics in Sociology that may be directly relevant to the thesis topics of graduate students. Students will be expected to complete weekly or bi-weekly readings based on the discretion of the faculty member that will form the basis of in-depth discussions, or discussion of written work that the student has submitted prior to the meeting. This course is meant to build on HS7888 Directed Reading. It offers graduate students the opportunity to work with a wider range of faculty members and therefore broaden their intellectual horizons and learn from different specialities.

 
 
HS7891 Independent Study 2 
This course provides students with an opportunity to engage in independent research related to their proposed thesis/dissertation. The content and requirements of each Independent Study module are determined by the student and individual faculty member. The actual topics in each syllabus will depend on the area of interest of the student and faculty member. In this course, students are expected to read widely both classical and contemporary readings under guidance of faculty. This course is meant to build on HS7889 Independent Study. It offers graduate students the opportunity to work with a wider range of faculty members and therefore broaden their intellectual horizons and learn from different specialities.

 
 
HS7909 Advanced Qualitative Methods in Social Research
This course examines the qualitative methods employed in social research. Students are required to take HS7003 Theory and Method in Social Research prior to this course. The course covers various issues of methodology in sociological research. Course themes include (1) epistemological and ethical issues, (2) research design, (3) participant observation, (4) ethnographic methods, (5) interviews, (6) content and discourse analysis.

 

 
HS7910 Special Topic: Advanced Quantitative Methods in Social Research
A PhD in sociology will require competence in advanced research methods. Students lacking necessary quantitative methods training will be required to take methods class prior to enrolling in HS9910. This course (or equivalent) will equip students with analytic competencies necessary for completion of their masters or PhD research. The syllabus for this course will be determined by the individual faculty subject to the approval of the Programme Head. The two basic options for satisfying the methods requirement are:

 
•  Completion of guided reading on quantitative methods (Probability, Regression Analysis, Log-Linear Modelling)   
   and philosophy of science within the Division of Sociology. 
•  Successful completion of a designated course in quantitative methods within NTU (NBS, psychology,   
   economics) 

 

 
Notes: 
• Courses and requirements are subject to review and change. 
• Not all courses are available in one given semester. 
• Courses will be offered on the basis of student intake, research areas and availability of faculty. 

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