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Course Description

The following courses are offered by Sociology. Not all courses are offered in an academic year. The core courses are HS7001, HS7002 and HS7003. Students are reminded to register and pass these courses when they are offered as they might not be offered every semester. 

Please click here​ for the courses that will be offered in a particular semester.


HS7001 Classical Sociological Theory and Research (core)
This course examines the theoretical foundations and research traditions of sociology as a discipline. In particular, the contributions of Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, and Max Weber are discussed against the backdrop of the social and intellectual contexts of their times. The course considers these and other classical theorists' continuing relevance for the analysis of social change and the development of social theory. 

Examples of course themes include:
​​• Social theory and the antecedents of disciplinary sociology 
• The social theory of Karl Marx 
• The social theory of Emile Durkheim 
• The social theory of Max Weber 
• Other contributions to classical sociological theory 



​HS7002 Contemporary Sociological Theory and Research​ (core)
Legacies of classical theory are critically reviewed in light of 20th century developments. New schools of social theory are examined. The syllabus centers on contributions of the following contemporary sociological theorists. Examples of course themes include Social Theory in the 20th century and beyond The Social Theory and Research of Major Theorists: e.g. Michel Foucault, Jürgen Habermas, Pierre Bourdieu.

Additionally, students will consider contributions of other theorists from a secondary list according to the discretion of the faculty.

 
 
HS7003 Theory and Method in Social Research (core for 2019 & earlier cohorts only)
The syllabus for this course will be determined by the individual faculty subject to the approval of the Division Head. It will focus on theoretical methods in social research; that is, the relationship between theory and data in the process of doing sociological research (Note: Some students may be required to take HS9910 in addition to or instead of this course). Course themes include: (1) Philosophy of Social Science, (2) The Logic of Social Research, (3) Applications of Social Research, (4) Research Design and Research Methods.


 
HS7888 Directed Reading in Sociology
This course is designed to provide a student with a more individualized course of reading that goes beyond the existing graduate courses. In this course, students are expected to read widely in both classical and contemporary sources under the guidance of their supervisor. The content and requirements of each Directed Reading course are determined by the student as well as his/her appointed supervisor pertaining to the student’s intended field of specialization. The reading list, written work and meeting times will be negotiated between the appointed supervisor and the student. The final detailed syllabus will be subjected to the approval of the Head of Division prior to the commencement of the course.

 
 
HS7889 Independent Study in Sociology
This course provides students with an opportunity to engage in independent research related to their proposed thesis. The content and requirements of each Independent Study module are determined by the appointed supervisor and the student, depending on their area of interest. In this course, students are expected to read widely in both classical and contemporary sources under the guidance of their supervisor.

 

HS7890 Directed Reading 2 
This course introduces specific topics in Sociology that may be directly relevant to the thesis topics of graduate students. Students will be expected to complete weekly or bi-weekly readings based on the discretion of the faculty member that will form the basis of in-depth discussions, or discussion of written work that the student has submitted prior to the meeting. This course is meant to build on HS7888 Directed Reading. It offers graduate students the opportunity to work with a wider range of faculty members and therefore broaden their intellectual horizons and learn from different specialities.

 
 
HS7891 Independent Study 2 
This course provides students with an opportunity to engage in independent research related to their proposed thesis/dissertation. The content and requirements of each Independent Study module are determined by the student and individual faculty member. The actual topics in each syllabus will depend on the area of interest of the student and faculty member. In this course, students are expected to read widely both classical and contemporary readings under guidance of faculty. This course is meant to build on HS7889 Independent Study. It offers graduate students the opportunity to work with a wider range of faculty members and therefore broaden their intellectual horizons and learn from different specialities.

 
 
HS7909 Advanced Qualitative Methods in Social Research
This course examines the qualitative methods employed in social research. Students are required to take HS7003 Theory and Method in Social Research prior to this course. The course covers various issues of methodology in sociological research. Course themes include (1) epistemological and ethical issues, (2) research design, (3) participant observation, (4) ethnographic methods, (5) interviews, (6) content and discourse analysis.​


 
Notes: 
• Courses and requirements are subject to review and change. 
• Not all courses are available in one given semester. 
• Courses will be offered on the basis of student intake, research areas and availability of faculty. 

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