Undergraduate

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Course Descriptions

HP1000 Introduction to Psychology
Semester(s) offered: 1 & 2
AUs: 3
Prerequisites: Nil
This course is an introductory overview of fundamental areas in the contemporary study of psychology. Topics include the biological bases of behaviour, sensation and perception, memory, thought and language, social behaviour, intelligence, motivation, learning, personality, and development.


HP1100 Fundamentals of Social Science Research
Semester(s) offered: 1 & 2
AUs: 3
Prerequisites: Nil
This is an introductory course to the research methods and basic statistical techniques commonly used in psychological research. Students will be introduced to the process of scientific inquiry in psychology, both in terms of empirical research methodology and statistical analysis. Research methods covered will mainly focus on experiments and survey research. Statistical techniques introduced will include correlation, simple linear regression, t-test, and analysis of variance for simple experimental design. Learning is through lectures and hands-on practices during tutorials.


HP2100 Research Design and Data Analysis in Psychology
Semester(s) offered: 2
AUs: 3
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100
Building upon on the basic statistics concepts introduced in HP1100, this course will discuss analysis of experimental data from simple and factorial designs using analysis of variance (ANOVA). Elementary concepts of multiple regression and test of association in categorical data will also be introduced. The course is divided into lectures and tutorials. In the lectures, we will focus on conceptual issues and cover the content materials that you need to understand in order to work with empirical data. In the tutorials, you will get hands-on experience with data analysis using SPSS.


HP2200 Biological Psychology
AUs: 3
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100
Biological psychology assumes that all behaviour can be explained by neural processes occurring within the brain and its interaction with the environment. This course will first examine the general architecture, subcomponents, and inter-cellular communication in the human brain. Next, we will examine the neural substrates of complex behaviours including perception, attention, memory, language, sleep, hunger, and addiction. In summary, students will learn how behavior is instantiated in the brain.


HP2300 Developmental Psychology
AUs: 3
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100
Human beings develop cognition, personality, social relations and emotions in fundamental ways. This course introduces students to the major milestones in the human lifespan, from infancy through childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Special emphasis is placed on the role of socialization and environmental factors in human development.


HP2400 Social Psychology
AUs: 3
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100
An individual's behaviour, thoughts and feelings are influenced by other people and by the social environment. This course examines topics such as interpersonal attraction, attitudes, social influences, social cognition, perception of the self, others and groups, altruism, aggression, conformity, and antisocial behaviour.


HP2500 Personality and Individual Differences
AUs: 3
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100
The study of human personality is central to psychology. This course surveys the major approaches, covering classical and contemporary themes such as psychodynamic theories, behavioural models, humanistic theories, trait theories, social learning theories as well as personality perspectives indigenous to cultures in the Asian region.


HP2600 Cognitive Psychology
AUs: 3
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100
The representation, processing and retention of information are basic psychological processes. In understanding these processes, this course covers topics such as attention, vigilance, pattern recognition, memory, language and reasoning, concept formation, artificial intelligence, and problem solving.


HP2700 Abnormal Psychology
AUs: 3
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100, HP2200
This course aims to build a broad foundation for the study of psychopathology by covering a whole range of abnormality described in the DSM-IV. The main aim is to acquaint students with the etiology and treatment of psychological disorders through the major paradigms of abnormal behaviour. Students learn to appreciate the multifarious factors that lead to mental illnesses. Case studies are used consistently to reflect the clinical approach adopted by the field in understanding mental illnesses. 


HP3002 Positive Psychology
AUs: 3
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100
Positive psychology redirects the attention of psychologists to the positive aspect of the adaptive and the pro-growth aspect of human psychology. The topic includes such psychological processes as positive emotions and cognitions, resilience and subjective wellbeing. The present course provide a review of recent research in positive psychology, critical analysis of issues and methodology involved in positive psychology and its potential application in applied work.

HP3003 Engineering Psychology
AUs: 3
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100, HP2600
Engineering Psychology aims to understand the capabilities and limitations of the human and use the knowledge to inform engineering design. It spans psychophysics, cognitive psychology, ergonomics, human-computer interaction, and engineering design. This course teaches students core concepts in engineering psychology and the use of these concepts to solve real-world problems.


HP3004 The Psychology of Food and Eating
AUs: 3
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100, HP2100
Decisions about what to eat and how much eat are among the most pervasive judgments and cognitions humans navigate in their daily lives. These decisions around food and subsequent eating behaviors have significant impact for health and well-being, given the rising incidences of chronic diseases associated with dietary patterns, such as obesity and type-2 diabetes. This course will cover psychological, social, and environmental processes that guide people’s cognitions and behaviors related to food and eating. A major theme of the course will focus on psychosocial and non-homeostatic factors that modulate appetite, and the psychological processes that may regulate or bias one’s experience of hunger and fullness. This course will adopt a holistic and integrative approach to study of these questions by examining the role of diverse contextual factors (social, cultural, economic, and evolutionary) in influencing the psychological processes regulating appetite and food intake patterns. By completing this course, students will have deeper understanding of key findings and theories related to psychological and behavioral aspects of human nutrition, ability to apply this knowledge to design studies to test their own hypotheses about eating behavior, and be equipped as more critical consumers of research pertaining to these topics. Given rising national and international priorities for addressing chronic diseases linked to dietary behavior (e.g., Singapore’s War on Diabetes), this course will provide students experience for potential future involvement in organizations, initiatives, and research targeting these health issues.


HP3101 Applied Statistical Methods for Psychological Research
AUs: 3
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100, HP2100
This is an intermediate level course in statistics for psychology research. The general focus of the course will be on advanced topics in analysis of variance (higher-order between-subjects design, repeated-measures design, split-plot design, Latin-square design, cross-over design, etc.) and regression analysis (multiple regression, polynomial regression, regression with categorical explanatory variables, moderation-mediation analysis and residual analysis). If time allows, topics such as non-parametric statistics, and/or path analysis may also be discussed.


HP3201 Evolutionary Psychology
AUs: 3
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP2200
The course will provide students with a basic background of evolutionary theory and how it may apply to the field of psychology. Training on evolutionary theory will address common misunderstandings and provide students with the necessary information so that they can think critically and independently about its relevance to understanding human behavior. During the course, we will see how evolutionary theory provides a theoretical framework for understanding basic survival strategies, sex and mating strategies, parenting and kinship, development, language, emotion, cooperation, conflict, aggression, warfare, social dominance, psychopathology, and other aspects of human behavior. The course will culminate in an effort to demonstrate how evolutionary theory can apply to all branches of psychology and to address the advantages and disadvantages that the evolutionary approach provides for advancing our understanding of mind and behavior. 


HP3203 Conservation Psychology
AUs: 3
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100
In this course, we will learn about the close relationship between humans and the natural environment. Students will be introduced to the many ecological issues uncovered by environmental scientists and conservation biologists. Once learning these issues, the course will focus on uncovering the role of psychology in understanding and fostering sustainable behaviour in human societies. Students will learn about studies investigating the ways humans think about and interact with nature. In addition, students will learn how education, value-systems, economies, and policy-making interact in affecting human impact on the environment. 


HP3204 An Ape's Guide to Human Language
AUs: 3
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100
This course is an introduction to psycholinguistics, through the frame of comparative psychology: How does the human mind process language? What are the innate skills we share with other animals that contribute to our language skills? What are the differences between humans and other animals that contribute to the human language faculty, and how language systems work. The course will cover fundamentals of language acquisition and language processing, from lexical access, context effects and priming, to embodied theories of language, neurobiology of language, and language disorder. The course uses comparative physiology, animal behaviour, and neuroscience, as way of framing the question 'What makes us human?'


HP3302 Cognitive Development
AUs: 3
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100, HP2100, HP2300, HP2600
The course focuses on the development of brain, motor function, perception and attention, memory, language, representation of physical and mental world, problem-solving, and reasoning. In addition, the course surveys major theories of cognitive development, including socio-cultural perspective, Piaget, Neo-Piaget, information-processing approach, and neuropsychological perspective.


HP3402 Social Cognition
AUs: 3
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100, HP2400
Social cognition has dominated social psychological research in the past few decades. It involves the application of cognitive principles to the understanding of social psychological processes. This course will introduce students to the foundational principles and theories that underlie social cognition research. Major topics surveyed will include person perception, stereotyping and prejudice, self, attitude, and the relation between cognition and behaviour.


HP3501 Human Motivation
AUs: 3
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100, HP2400, HP2500
This course looks at the question of why people are motivated to think and act in the ways that they do. In order to answer this question, we will study human motivation using a combination of various perspectives, such as biological, social, personality, developmental, and cognitive areas of psychology. The course is discussion and writing intensive and will be conducted in a format that promotes analysis and in-depth review of classical and current motivation research.


HP3601 Human Memory
AUs: 3
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100, HP2600
Memory is vital for defining who we are, by allowing us to base actions on knowledge gleaned from previous experiences. It also is important for performing everyday tasks so that we can keep track of intermediate stages before a behavior is completed. Research in memory concerns more than pure storage. It also focuses on how memories are used by examining strategic selection, executive processes, and the interaction with other cognitive functions including attention, perception, and decision making. Modern research has focused on discovering the mechanisms of memory by examining the neural basis of memory. The objectives of the course are to (1) to learn the critical importance of the cognitive/neuroscience approach to studying memory, (2) to learn to define the different types of memory, and the situation in which each type of memory must be recruited to allow the successful completion of a behavior (3) to inform about the state-of-the art research in memory including practical applications. At the end of the course, students will have a solid understanding of the fundamentals in memory research, at both a practical and theoretical level.


HP3603 Sensation and Perception
AUs: 3
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100
Perception science has a long tradition, and is a great example for inter-disciplinary science, involving the fields of psychology, philosophy, biology, physiology, medicine, anthropology, physics, computer science, and art. The main purpose of this course is to cover different aspects of visual experience from many angles, including theories, underlying neural mechanisms, and their scientific evidence.


HP3702 Child Psychopathology
AUs: 3
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100, HP2300
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the rapidly expanding field of child psychopathology. This will be an introductory module surveying the various childhood disorders as described in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR). An integrative perspective, acknowledging biological, psychological, social, and emotional influences and their interdependence, will be explored to explain the causes and effects of the presented childhood disorders. In addition, developmental processes that shape and are shaped by the expression of each disorder will be considered, within the context of family, peers, school, community, culture and society. Current approaches to treatment and prevention will also be briefly highlighted.


HP3703 Health Psychology
AUs: 3
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100
This is an advanced psychology course that focuses on the interaction between psychological, behavioral, social, and biological factors on health. The course is designed to inform students about health psychology theory through class discussion, media presentations, and guest speakers (when possible). In addition to piquing curiosity about health psychology, the primary goals of the course are to help students gain knowledge about the exciting field of health psychology, to develop skills for critically evaluating health psychology research, and to understand how health psychology is applied to improve individuals’ wellness. Specific learning objectives will be provided with each course unit.


HP3704 Introduction to Clinical Neuropsychology
AUs: 3
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100, HP2200, HP2700
This is an introductory course to clinical neuropsychology. This course will provide the foundation for students interested to pursue graduate studies in clinical neuropsychology. We will briefly cover the history and development of neuropsychology, neuroanatomy and neurophysiology as related to brain function and behavior, and survey clinical disorders involved. Consideration of the contributions of neurology, experimental and clinical neuropsychology to the understanding of normal cognitive and affective functioning and of disturbances resulting from brain damage in selected areas will also be presented.


HP3708 Biopsychosocial Criminology
AUs: 3
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100
This course provides an introduction to psychological perspectives on criminal and antisocial behavior. It will also incorporate knowledge from interdisciplinary areas to examine the interplay between psychological, social, and biological factors in predisposing to crime and violence. Different developmental trajectories and forms of crime and criminals will be discussed. Throughout the course, we will also attempt to bridge the basic science of criminal behavior with the real world through case studies and discussion of the implications of psychological and criminological research for the criminal justice system. The content of this course deals with the developmental, neuroscience, clinical, social, and cognitive subdivisions of psychology.


HP3802 Personnel Psychology
AUs: 3
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100
This course exams the application of psychological principles to assessment, personnel selection, training, performance appraisal, and separation - the complete work cycle. In doing so, the course builds on basic principles of psychology, research methods, and testing of individual differences. The topics will be examined from individual, organizational, and cultural aspects. The goal is for students to understand the fundamentals of the personnel process from both a theoretical perspective and from an applied perspective in an increasingly complex, diverse world.


HP3804 Psychological Testing
AUs: 3
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100
This course is an introduction to the principles underlying educational and psychological measurement and testing. The general goals of this course are to explore the nature, problems, challenges and potential of psychology testing. The first half of the course is devoted to the foundations of psychological testing in various contexts. As part of this we examine topics such as the historical roots of psychological testing, uses of psychological tests, ethical considerations, and technical and methodological principles involved in developing and evaluating test materials. The second section of the course surveys major types of psychological tests, such as intellectual ability, educational aptitude, personality and assessment in the workplace. By the end of the course students are expected to understand the basics of test theory and test construction, and be able to critically evaluate the tests that we consider in the course which are drawn from tests commonly used in the field of psychological testing.


HP3805 Managing Organisational Behavior
AUs: 3
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100
The course explores the three determinants of behavior in organizations: individuals, groups, and structure. Using recent research to explore practical questions relevant to managing successful organizations, students will learn about individual issues including attitudes, personality, motivation, and emotion; group factors such as teamwork, communication, leadership, power, and negotiation; and organizational structure and culture.


HP3806 Consumer Psychology
AUs: 3
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100
This course is about the processes of consumption which include selection, purchasing, using, and discarding goods, services, ideas, and experiences. It examines the implication of psychological and societal factors that affect the processes of consumption. Proper understanding of the interaction between mind and environment behind consumer behavior is crucial for those students who desire to work at marketing sectors. The goal of this course is to provide the foundations to understand consumer insight – the desires and necessities that are on the surface of consumers’ conscious thought and the deeper, possibly unconscious motives that drive human behavior at an implicit level. To achieve this goal, students will be exposed to a thorough understanding of the internal and external factors that influence consumer behaviour. Working in an area that is so critical to almost every business activity brings a high degree of excitement and a justifiable sense of importance.


HP3807 Occupational Health Psychology
AUs: 3
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100
Occupational health psychology is the application of psychology to improve the quality of work life and to protect and promote the safety, health, and well-being of workers. This course reviews fundamental theories and explores findings from cutting-edge research in industrial/organizational psychology, health psychology, and occupational health, because occupational health psychology is an interdisciplinary field of study. The objective of this course is to provide students with a thorough understanding of the various factors that affect workers’ physical and psychological health and well-being and opportunities to apply the knowledge to health and safety issues in the modern workplace. This course is organized along the following themes: (1) introduction, (2) theories and models, (3) causes, (4) symptoms, and (5) treatments.


HP3901 Cultural Psychology
AUs: 3
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100
Culture, sub-culture and ethnic group membership affect behaviour in a variety of ways. This course introduces students to theories of, and research in, the influence of culture upon basic psychological processes such as cognition, the conceptualization of self, as well as developmental processes.


HP4002 Qualitative Methods in Psychology
AUs: 4
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100
This course introduces the theoretical foundations and basic techniques of qualitative methodology for psychological research, including how to conduct interviews and focus groups, grounded theory, content analysis, domain analysis, and how to write up qualitative findings. Students will be expected to complete weekly readings and weekly skill development tasks in and out of the classroom as well as to collect data, and then analyze and present findings based on the techniques covered in the course.


HP4012 Applied Multivariate Methods for Psychological Research
AUs: 4
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100, HP2100, HP3101
Multivariate methods are a set of tools for analyzing multiple variables (obtained from multiple time points, multiple measures and/or multiple samples) in an integrated and powerful manner. It can enrich our understanding of the interrelatedness between and within sets of variables and provide greater assurance that we come to some conclusions with more validity than if we were to analyze these variables in isolation. The focus of this course is the analysis, interpretation, and reporting multivariate statistical analyses frequently used in psychological studies. It prepares students with advanced quantitative skills for conducting independent research and their final year project. Conceptual understanding, including appropriate circumstances for use of each technique, the development of practical "how-to" skills, and an understanding of the trade-offs made in technique choice will be emphasized. Topics covered in this course include factor analysis, MANOVA, logistic regression and discriminant analysis, multidimensional scaling, cluster analysis, etc.


HP4021 Laboratory in Human and Animal Neuroscience
AUs: 4
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100, HP2200
The main purpose of this Laboratory course is for students to acquire knowledge and skills in the field of Human and Animal Neuroscience. A secondary aim of the course is for students to develop their critical appraisal of how Human and Animal Neuroscience can be applied to study the mechanisms behind typical and atypical development. The course focuses on practical application with weekly opportunities to apply the techniques introduced in class. Students will collect and analyze data, write up a research paper, and present the results in class.


HP4031 Laboratory in Developmental Psychology
AUs: 4
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100, HP2300
In this laboratory course, students will be introduced to some common research paradigms and methods used in Developmental Psychology. The course will have a specific applied focus in which students will gain hands-on practical experience in working with actual data sets, analyzing the data using appropriate statistical techniques and writing up a research paper. Data from different populations such as children and adolescents will be examined. Students will learn the basics of scale development with reference to a child/adolescent population, using factor analysis. In addition, students will also be introduced to methods and issues in the area of child/adolescent developmental psychopathology and related intervention work.


HP4041 Laboratory in Social Psychology
AUs: 4
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100, HP2100, HP2400
This laboratory course introduces students to the techniques used in conducting social psychological research. Readings and discussions will focus on both qualitative and quantitative methodology commonly used in empirical enquiries in social psychology. Examples of qualitative methods are naturalistic observation, structured interview, and content analysis. Quantitative methods will include implicit and explicit measures of attitudes, priming, response latency measures, and other behavioral manipulation in laboratory experiments. Students will gain hands-on experience in the various techniques that they have learned through conducting their own research projects.


HP4051 Laboratory in Personality and Individual Differences
AUs: 4
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100, HP2500
This course will focus on the practical use of concepts, methodologies, and tools needed in evaluating and designing personality and individual differences empirical research. We will cover a variety of topics in measurement, instrument choice and design, hypothesis development and testing, and data preparation and manipulation, including statistical issues, tools for conducting personality and individual differences studies, and study design and evaluation methods.


HP4061 Laboratory in Cognitive Psychology
AUs: 4
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100, HP2600
In this laboratory course, students will be introduced to common research paradigms and methods used in Cognitive Psychology. The course will have a specific applied focus in which students will gain hands-on practical experience in gathering data using classical paradigms, analyzing the data using appropriate statistical technique, writing up, and presenting a research paper. In addition, students will also be introduced to research methods and analyses in the key cognitive psychology areas of perception, attention, memory, and reasoning.


HP4081 Laboratory in Industrial and Organizational Psychology
AUs: 4
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100, HP3801 or HP3805
Industrial and organizational psychology is the scientific study of human behavior in the workplace and applies psychological principles to workplace issues facing individuals, teams, and organizations. The objective of this lab course is to equip students with knowledge and skills in methodology and critical thinking that are needed to conduct focused independent research in industrial and organizational psychology.


HP4091 Current Research in Cultural Psychology
AUs: 4
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100, HP2500
Cultural psychology research focuses on the psychological processes involved in individuals’ interactions with their cultural surroundings. This course introduces students to the most up-to-date research topics in cultural psychology through in-depth discussions of empirical and theoretical articles. Research methodological issues specific to conducting cultural psychological research will also be covered. Students will gain hands-on experience with these research techniques in cultural psychological research through conducting their own research projects.


HP4102 Trauma Psychology, Crisis Intervention and Management
AUs: 4
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100, HP2700
The course covers concepts of emergency behaviour and psychological trauma arising from disasters and crises. Due emphasis will be given to the development of psychological resilience and coping strategies. A fair proportion of the course will be devoted to practical learning of crisis intervention and management skills to address the mental health issues and traumatic effects of victims of crises.


HP4103 The Forensic Psychology of Crime, Terrorism and Disasters
AUs: 4
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100
This module covers an introduction to the psychology of crime, terrorism and disasters. A large part of it covers criminological psychology, applying psychological theory to criminal investigations, the psychology of disasters and accidents and in general the application of psychology in criminal, security and safety contexts. This course will benefit those who have an interest in working with the police, prisons, civil defence, child custody areas, as well as counselling, clinical and forensic settings.


HP4104 Evidence-based Practice in Clinical Psychology
AUs: 4
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100, HP2700
This course covers empirically supported treatments (cognitive-behavioural, psychodynamic) for major problem areas (depression, personality disorders, neuropsychological impairment) and examines elements of effective therapy relationships (empathy, working alliance, collecting patient feedback) as well as effective methods of adapting treatment to the individual patient (reactance/resistance level, preferences, culture, religion and spirituality). This course aims to encourage a critical stance when considering the empirical status of treatment models and their clinical applications and provides hands-on experience in adopting elements of a therapeutic relationship.


HP4105 Correctional Psychology
AUs: 4
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100, HP2700
This course equips students with an understanding of the application of psychology in a correctional setting. Students will be instructed on the causes and motivations behind offending behaviour. This would help students to identify factors associated with offending behaviour, in order that these factors can be elicited in assessment and addressed in intervention. Emphasis will be placed on how specific offender populations (sex offenders, violent offenders, drug offenders, juvenile offenders, women offenders) are assessed, and how intervention principles and strategies are adapted to address specific concerns by these groups. This course aims to encourage students to adopt a scientist-practitioner approach in offender rehabilitation, by considering evidence-based research to influence applied practice.


HP4106 Mental Health in the Community
AUs: 4
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100, HP2700
This course examines community-based approaches and interventions for promoting community well-being as well as preventing and managing mental health illnesses. The course covers exciting, innovative approaches such as low intensity psychotherapeutic interventions, telemedicine, and promoting mental health messages through new approaches (e.g., social media) – efforts aiming at plugging gaps in services that have traditionally focused on treating more clinically significant illnesses. There will be discussions on emerging research that examines the implementation and outcomes of community mental health programmes and the controversies and challenges in-down-scaling psychological interventions to new settings where they are administered by professionals not traditionally trained in the specialization of psychology. Issues relating to the current state of mental health in Singapore and efforts to improve it will be touched on. Students will be encouraged to apply lessons learned to the Singapore context.


HP4107 Industrial-Organisational Psychology in Practice
AUs: 4
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100
This applied course aims to introduce students to the theories and practices of Industrial and Organisational Psychology (Occupational Psychology) as applied to individuals at work and to organisations. Students who have an interest in applying psychology to work settings will be exposed to a scope of topics that are relevant to the practice in both private and public sectors.


HP4201 Technology and Social Behaviour
AUs: 4
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100, HP2400
Emerging technologies such as social networking and virtual worlds have become an inseparable part of our lives. They inevitably change our social behaviors and relationships. The purpose of the seminar is to introduce students to the up-to-date interdisciplinary research on emerging technologies and social behavior.


HP4222 The Neuroscience of Love
AUs: 4
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100, HP2200
This course aims to give an advanced introduction of social neuroscience, applying scientific concepts and research methods onto a range of human and cross-species relationships, including romantic love, familial love, parent-child bonding, cross-species affection etc.


HP4232 Development of Self-Regulation
AUs: 4
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100, HP2100, HP2200, HP2300, HP2400, HP2500, HP2600, HP2700
This course provides undergraduate students with an advanced introduction to empirical findings, methods, and theoretical perspectives on the development of self-regulation. Topics include the development of executive function, theory of mind, and emotion regulation. General developmental trajectories as well as individual differences will be covered. Both biological and environmental impacts, including genetic disposition, parental practices, socio-economic status, and culture, on the development of self-regulation will be discussed. Additionally, developmental disorders related to self-regulation will be introduced.


HP4233 Psychological and Sociomoral Reasoning in Infancy
AUs: 4
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100, either HP2300 or HP2500 or HP2600
This course provides undergraduate students with an advanced introduction to empirical findings, methods, and theoretical perspectives from the field of social cognition. Students will learn about young children’s psychological reasoning. Topics will include how infants make sense of intentional actions of an agent in a scene, by specifying the agent’s mental states such as informational states, and motivational states, and how infants identify agents. Review of early psychological reasoning sets the stage for learning about early socio-moral reasoning, where students will learn about how young children reason about the interactions between two or more agents. Topics will include sociomoral expectations that apply to all individuals, expectations that apply to individuals from the same social group, and expectations that depend on individuals’ prior interactions.


HP4242 Advanced Topics in Social Cognition
AUs: 4
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100, HP2400
Social cognition has dominated social psychological research in the past few decades. In this seminar, we will have an in-depth analysis of how cognitive principles are involved in social psychological processes. We will survey the major topics in social cognitive research and have in-depth analysis of the empirical studies conducted in the under each topic. Some of the topics to be covered in this seminar include personal perception, stereotyping and prejudice, automatic and controlled processes in social cognition, and the relation between cognition and behavior.


HP4243 Intergroup relations
AUs: 4
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100, HP2100, HP2400
This course covers the social and psychological processes that influence how people perceive, categorize, and behave towards those who belong to other groups (outgroups). Course content will especially focus on psychological and behavioral manifestations of problematic intergroup relations, such as stereotyping, prejudice, discrimination, and intergroup conflict. While prejudice and discrimination are typically associated with groups defined based on race and ethnicity, this course will also explore the psychology of intergroup relations in other domains, such as gender, age, teams, organizations, disability/illness, and stigmatized traits.


HP4262 Multisensory Integration
AUs: 4
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100
This course introduces students to basic findings and theories of research on vision, audition, and visual-auditory integration. It will focus on the brain mechanisms for the individual sensory systems and integrating the sensory systems, and its application in multimedia processing. The course is pitched on an advanced level so that students can broaden their knowledge of vision, audition, and multimedia perception for future research.


HP4263 Language in Perception & Thought
AUs: 4
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100, either HP2300, HP2500 or HP2600
This course provides students with an advanced introduction to empirical findings, methods, and theoretical perspectives from the field of psycholinguistics, as they pertain to the relationship between language, perception and thought. In the first half of the semester, the Whorfian Hypothesis will be introduced. Topics will include grammatical gender, categorical perception, spatial and numerical cognition. Perspectives from the domain of cross-modal perception and synaesthesia will be introduced to provide neurological bases for language-perception interactions. In the second half of the course, students will conduct a mini-study on interactions between language and vision, language and audition, or language and number, the results of which they will present at the end of the semester. An in-depth focus on the development of speech perception will be used as a test case for discussions about the direction of influence between language and cognition/perception. Interactions between mind and language in extreme scenarios will also be addressed.


HP4271 Cognitive Neuroplasticity
AUs: 4
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100, HP2200, HP2600
Recent discoveries have overturned longstanding beliefs that the neurophysiology of the brain remains relatively fixed after childhood. We will discuss new research that compares and contrasts both adult and child neural cognitive neuroplasticity. This course will review behaviors that can lead to increased neurogenesis and changes in neural connectivity. At the end of course, students will have a clear understanding how specific experiences are linked with specific changes within the brain.


HP4272 Neuropsychology
AUs: 4
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100, HP2200, HP2600, HP2700
The purpose of the seminar is to introduce students to the fast growing field of neuropsychology where neuroimaging is applied as an advanced technique to study brain functions. This is an interdisciplinary domain that has its roots in psychology, neuroscience and biomedical engineering, and has important bearings in advancing psychology as an interdisciplinary science. The course attempts to provide an introduction to major neuroimaging techniques in neuropsychology in studying brain function, as well as, how these techniques can be combined complementarily to answer some of the more perplexing questions in cognitive neuroscience. We will focus on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) as a measurement technique that observe brain functions as it occurs and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) as a manipulation technique that change how the brain functions. With these foundations, students will be exposed to readings on how these techniques are applied to various areas of neuropsychology to advance our knowledge of the intrinsic properties of brain function, higher cognition in subcortical structures, severe mental illness, and the normal aging process of the brain as well as pathological aging in dementia.


HP4273 Introduction to Functional MRI
AUs: 4
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100, HP2200, HP2600, HP2700
The purpose of the seminar is to introduce students to the fast growing field of neuroimaging as an advanced technique to study brain functions. This is an interdisciplinary domain that has its roots in psychology, neuroscience and biomedical engineering, and has important bearings in advancing psychology as an interdisciplinary science. The course will mainly focus on introducing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) as a measurement technique of brain functions. Other neuroimaging techniques will be briefly introduced as a contrast to fMRI.


HP4274 The Last Dance: Psycho-social-cultural perspectives of Death, Dying and Bereavement
AUs: 4
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100, HP2300
The study of death and dying is concerned with questions that are rooted at the core of human experience. Individuals who set out to increase their knowledge of mortality are embarking on life’s most important exploration, a journey of personal discovery and spiritual awakening. Whilst acknowledging the finite nature of existence allows individuals to reflect upon the meaning of life to attend greater personhood, mortality also plays a pivotal role in defining cultural beliefs, family values and social structures. This course provides an interdisciplinary overview of the major psycho-socio-cultural perspectives, theories and clinical practices on death and dying from a global viewpoint with a critical focus on the Asian experience. Through interactive lectures, experiential workshops and creative group projects, students will be offered an opportunity to examine the psychological, socio-spiritual, ethical and political issues of mortality through a range of cultural lenses. Such exploration will facilitate insights, reflections and personal growth for enhancing students’ capacity in dealing with the inevitability of morality, while equipping them with the core intellectual skills and values for living a meaningful and purposeful life.


HP4281 Psychology of Leadership
AUs: 4
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100, HP3801
This undergraduate seminar provides students with a theory-based, integrative, hands-on, practical view of leadership from the individual and organizational perspectives. Students will use a cross-cultural perspective to distill useful and practical concepts from each theory, which will be reinforced with individual interactive on-line activities and self-assessments designed to highlight practical application and personal skills. Class meetings will review theory and concepts in the psychological literature and provide opportunity for group discussion and class debate, supplemented with experiential activities, role plays, and case studies designed strengthen skills with diagnosing situations and applying the appropriate leadership style.


HP4282 Negotiation and Conflict Resolution
AUs: 4
Prerequisites: HP1000, HP1100, HP3801
This course will develop your understanding of the principles, strategies, and tactics of effective negotiation and professional relationship management. You will also increase awareness and understanding of ethical principles and stakeholder considerations that influence the choices offered and made in transactions and relationships.